Categories
Categorías

Nurses and Comic Relief

A memorable image of negative mysticism in “East Coker” is that of the “dying nurse” whose “constant care” is to “remind” patients that “to be restored, our sickness must grow worse”. This reminder may apply to Lord Claverton: Eliot places the protagonist of The Elder Statesman in the position of learning a lesson in humility before his peaceful death, and we may think of this experience as a metaphorical illness.

Lord Claverton is nursed by his devoted daughter Monica, who accompanies him to Badgley Court for a “rest cure” after his retirement. There is a matron at Badgley Court, Mrs. Piggot, although she would rather not be addressed by that name. She is determined to create a friendly atmosphere, closer to a hotel than to a hospital. We may consider this an instance of her foolishness, which, together with garrulousness and a tendency to intrude, are a source of comedy. Lord Claverton and Monica patiently listen to Mrs. Piggot as she tells them that her husband was “a distinguished surgeon,” whom she met “during an appendicitis operation”. She also informs the new guests that “when you want to be very quiet / There’s the Silence Room. With a television set”.

Mrs. Piggot’s chat with Lord Claverton separates two more crucial interactions for him, with Federico Gomez and Mrs. Carghill respectively. These two characters also contribute to comedy with the details of their eventful lifes, with their spontaneity, candidness, and their striking lack of respect for Lord Claverton. They know of his past sins and return to unmask him, causing him to search his conscience – perhaps Gomez and Mrs. Carghill are the nurses who administer Lord Claverton his medicine for humility.

We may compare Mrs. Piggot with Mrs. Carghill (who considers the former “unbearable”), but also with Julia Shuttlethwaite in The Cocktail Party or Lady Elizabeth in The Confidential Clerk – all lively, whimsical ladies with potential for comedy. However, unlike Mrs. Piggot, they all have major and defined dramatic roles. The matron of Badgley Court confirms Mrs. Carghill’s identity for Lord Claverton (as if to confirm that she is real, and not an apparition). Apart from this, her function in The Elder Statesman is mainly to provide comic relief, as the protagonist feels the pressure of regret more and more acutely.

The Elder Statesman premiered at the Edinburgh Festival in 1958, and then moved to the West End. The character of Mrs. Piggot and her gentle humour are typical of drawing-room comedy. The medium Eliot chose was a risk for him, but here he finally mastered it.